= SOLD OUT

  • June 2019

  • 20

    Ethan Allen’s Capture of Fort Ticonderoga and the Battle of Bennington Date: Thursday, June 20, 2019 Time: 2:00 pm-3:30 pm Location: Burr and Burton Academy, Hunter Seminar Room Fee: $15 in advance; $20 at the door

    This talk will tell the thrilling story of Ethan Allen and the Green Mountain Boys leaving Bennington and traveling north through Manchester to Fort Ticonderoga. The fort was then captured on May 10, 1775 for “America’s First Victory.” Two years later in 1777, British General Burgoyne came south from Canada, recaptured Fort Ticonderoga causing the Americans to evacuate and come through Manchester. On his way to Saratoga, Burgoyne ran out of supplies and sent a contingent to capture the stores at Bennington. The resulting Battles of Bennington and Saratoga resulted in the turning point of the Revolution because the French entered on the American side.

  • 25

    The Treaty of Versailles Date: Tuesday, June 25, 2019 Time: 5:30 pm-7:00 pm Location: Burr and Burton Academy, Hunter Seminar Room Fee: $15 in advance; $20 at the door

    The 100th anniversary of the signing of the Treaty of Versailles will be June 28, 2019. This Treaty which concluded the First World War laid the blame for the war squarely on Germany and its allies, imposed very heavy reparations on Germany and established the League of Nations. In retrospect, it is seen by some as a vindictive failure which contributed to the causes of the Second World War twenty years later. The United States Senate refused to ratify the Treaty largely because joining the League of Nations required giving up in part some sovereignty and placed internationalism above nationalism. This is just as pertinent today as it was 100 years ago.

  • July 2019

  • 16

    Once the Guns Fell Silent: Germany between Versailles and Hitler Date: Tuesday, July 16, 2019 Time: 5:30 pm-7:00 pm Location: Burr and Burton Academy, Hunter Seminar Room Fee: $15 in advance; $20 at the door

    The centennial of the Versailles Treaty offers an opportunity to reflect on its legacy. The years between the cessation of fighting in November 1918 and the ascent of Adolf Hitler as Chancellor of Germany in February 1933 were fraught. As things turned out, developments in Europe did not point to the aspired end of conflict. This was especially so in Germany, where the post-war years signaled a seemingly continuous struggle to make sense of politics, the economy, indeed of normal life. This lecture will concentrate on key years of post-war Germany (1918-1933), serving to provide a broader context and a better understanding of what ensued thereafter.

  • 23

    Where’s Teddy When We Need Him? Clues from the Progressive Era to Address Today’s Problems Date: Tuesday, July 23, 2019 Time: 5:30 pm-7:00 pm Location: Burr and Burton Academy, Hunter Seminar Room Fee: $15 in advance; $20 at the door

    Some observers are comparing the U.S. today to the Gilded Age at the end of the 19th century, a time during which a relatively small number of financiers and entrepreneurs amassed enormous fortunes and the gap between the haves and have-nots became a yawning chasm. The Progressive Movement arose slowly during the last decade of that century and then gained national momentum during the years between Theodore Roosevelt's ascendancy to the Presidency and the election of Warren G. Harding as President in 1920. A central aim of the Progressive Movement was to address the excesses of the Gilded Age and to bring a greater sense of equity to national life.

  • August 2019

  • 13

    The Arctic Ocean and the North Pole Date: Tuesday, August 13, 2019 Time: 5:30 pm-7:00 pm Location: Burr and Burton Academy, Hunter Seminar Room Fee: $15 in advance; $20 at the door

    In 1999, Dave Golibersuch was one of eleven adventurers who reenacted polar explorers Robert Peary and Matthew Henson’s 1906 “final dash” to the Pole. For twelve days, 250 miles were traversed over the frozen ocean by ski and dogsled. This talk will recount this life altering journey during which physical, mental and emotional challenges were confronted. Then we will take a look at what has happened to the Arctic Ocean in the twenty years since then. We’ll ponder possible futures for the Arctic at large involving commercial, shipping, and military activities. And finally, the question “Who owns the Arctic?” will be addressed.