= SOLD OUT

  • May 2019

  • 28

    Objectivity in the Fake News Era *NEW LOCATION* Date: Tuesday, May 28, 2019 Time: 5:30 pm-7:00 pm Location: Manchester Community Library Fee: $15 in advance; $20 at the door

    Can you spot fake news? Is journalism increasingly challenged in this so-called post-truth era? This talk will provide ways for listeners to ensure that the news they get is accurate, and for news organizations to safeguard their reporting as fair and correct. It will also explore the role of journalists in being better ethical stewards of the news.

  • June 2019

  • 04

    How to Deal with North Korea’s Nuclear and Missile Challenges Date: Tuesday, June 4, 2019 Time: 5:30 pm-7:00 pm Location: Manchester Community Library Fee: $15 in advance; $20 at the door

    Arguably, the North Korean nuclear/missile problem is presently one of the most challenging U.S. foreign policy issues, because the nation can directly threaten the U.S. mainland unless the issue is resolved in a peaceful manner. Given this importance, this lecture first addresses North Korea’s motives for nuclear and missile development, then explores how the international community has handled the pressing issue. Based upon this historical analysis, the speaker gives his own ideas of resolving the long-standing, difficult issue.

  • 13

    Children of Immigrants and the Future of the U.S. Date: Thursday, June 13, 2019 Time: 2:00 pm-3:30 pm Location: Burr and Burton Academy, Hunter Seminar Room Fee: $15 in advance; $20 at the door

    This presentation will use the U.S. Census Data to trace patterns of social and economic integration among the U.S. born children of immigrants in the 21st century and find out whether they are succeeding and/or assimilating the way children of 20th century immigrants did. This is a crucial question since they must help fill the shoes of retiring Baby Boomers. The success and assimilation of this “new second generation” will significantly influence the character and prosperity of our society going forward. In this way, we will spend the evening glimpsing our country’s future.

  • July 2019

  • 23

    The Weekly Roundtable (Tues. Mornings) Date: Tuesday, July 23, 2019 Time: 9:30 am-11:00 am Location: Equinox Village Fee: $75

    This weekly discussion group will consider the broader issues that underlie current events. A moderator proposes topics, may suggest relevant readings, and guides the discussion. Come hear what others are thinking and voice your own opinion. Limited to 15 participants. Moderated by Steven Sinding.

  • 30

    The GMALL Debate 2019 Date: Tuesday, July 30, 2019 Time: 5:30 pm-7:00 pm Location: Long Trail School Fee: $15 in advance; $20 at the door

    The GMALL Debate 2019: “The motion before this meeting is that THE PRESENT CONSTITUTION IS OBSOLETE AND SHOULD BE REPLACED.”

  • August 2019

  • 06

    The Double-Edged American Dream Date: Tuesday, August 6, 2019 Time: 5:30 pm-7:00 pm Location: Burr and Burton Academy, Hunter Seminar Room Fee: $15 in advance; $20 at the door

    The American Dream is a long-running and inspiring national-greatness myth. It posits boundless resources, freedoms and successes. Until recently the myth largely kept its overall promise, though not always and not for all. But in the 1970s, a lost war in Vietnam and an overwhelmed domestic economy launched persistent wage stagnation for many Americans. Still, despite widespread dissatisfactions, the sky’s-the-limit Dream remains a national ethos, often luring us into costly lost wars abroad and infrastructure neglect at home. Many who feel left behind blame others rather than reexamining the Dream’s (and America’s) inherent limitations.

  • 27

    Understanding the Venezuelan Crisis Date: Tuesday, August 27, 2019 Time: 5:30 pm-7:00 pm Location: Manchester Community Library Fee: $15 in advance; $20 at the door

    Venezuela’s political and economic conditions have deteriorated significantly over the last few years. The crisis has caused very difficult humanitarian conditions and has driven millions across borders to adjacent countries, amplifying the consequences for domestic domain. What is the context of the crisis? How did matters get so bad? What are the implications for the hemisphere? And what solutions can be applied? These are some of the questions that will be addressed.